I’ve been dealing with concurrency for many years in the context of C++ and D (see my presentation about Software Transactional Memory in D). I worked for a startup, Corensic, that made an ingenious tool called Jinx for detecting data races using a lightweight hypervisor. I recorded a series of screencasts teaching concurrency to C++ programmers. If you follow these screencasts you might realize that I was strongly favoring functional approach to concurrency, promoting immutability and pure functions. I even showed how non-functional looking code leads to data races that could be detected by (now defunct) Jinx. Essentially I was teaching C++ programmers how to imitate Haskell.

Except that C++ could only support a small subset of Haskell functionality and provide no guarantees against even the most common concurrency errors.

It’s unfortunate that most programmers haven’t seen what Haskell can do with concurrency. There is a natural barrier to learning a new language, especially one that has the reputation of being mind boggling. A lot of people are turned off simply by unfamiliar syntax. They can’t get over the fact that in Haskell a function call uses no parentheses or commas. What in C++ looks like

f(x, y)

in Haskell is written as:

f x y

Other people dread the word “monad,” which in Haskell is essentially a tool for embedding imperative code inside functional code.

Why is Haskell syntax the way it is? Couldn’t it have been more C- or Java- like? Well, look no farther than Scala. Because of Java-like syntax the most basic functional trick, currying a function, requires a Scala programmer to anticipate this possibility in the function definition (using special syntax: multiple pairs of parentheses). If you have no access to the source code for a function, you can’t curry it (at least not without even more syntactic gymnastics).

If you managed to wade through this post so far, you are probably not faint of heart and you will accept the challenge of reading an excellent article by Simon Peyton Jones, Beautiful Concurrency that does a great job of explaining to the uninitiated Haskell’s beautiful approach to concurrency. It’s not a new article, but it has been adapted to the new format of the School of Haskell by Yours Truly, which means you’ll be able to run code examples embedded in it. If you feel adventurous, you might even edit them and see how the results change.

Advertisements