I only went to one talk, not because the rest was not interesting, quite the contrary, but because I worked with Joel and Hartmut on rewriting Proto. I think we essentially got it. We have the exrpession monad implemented, my “compile” function turned out to be the equivalent of Proto transform, but with much more flexibility, expression extension produced a little Lambda EDSL with placeholders for arguments and even const terminals. It works like a charm. If you don’t know what I’m talking about, I promise to finish my blog series on monads in C++ real soon now.

The talk I went to was Chris Kohlhoff talking more about Asio, the asynchronous IO library. He was showing how the new features of C++11 make his code simpler, safer, and more flexible without too much effort. In particular he found move semantics extremely helpful in reducing (or, in some cases, eliminating) the need for memory allocation in steady state–an important property when running in an embedded system, for instance. But what I liked most was his approach to solving the inversion of control problem by implementing his own coroutines. Sure, he had to abuse C++ macros, but the code was actually much more readable and reflected the way we think about asynchronous calls.

The idea is that, with coroutines, you write your code in a linear way. You say “read socket asynchronously” and then yield. The flow of control exits the coroutine in the middle, and continues with other tasks. The trick is that the rest of the coroutine becomes your completion handler. When the async call completes, the coroutine is called again, but it starts executing right after the last yield. Your flow of control moves back and forth, but your code looks linear, instead of being fragmented into a bunch of handlers. It makes you wish coroutines were part of the language, as they are, for instance, in C#.

By the way, I caught Hans Boehm while he was waiting for the airport shuttle and asked questions about memory_order_relaxed. You know, the problem is, Can a relaxed load fetch an “out of thin air” value–a value that has never been written by anybody else? What I’m getting now is that in practice this will never happen, but it’s very hard to describe this requirement formally. In other words, Can a malicious chip manufacturer in cahoots with a compiler writer come up with a system that fulfills the letter of the C++ memory model and lets you fetch an out-of-thin-air value? I think the answer is yes, because the language of the Standard is purposely vague on this topic:

(29.3.11) [ Note: The requirements do allow r1 == r2 == 42 in the following example, with x and y initially zero:

// Thread 1:
r1 = x.load(memory_order_relaxed);
if (r1 == 42) y.store(r1, memory_order_relaxed);
// Thread 2:
r2 = y.load(memory_order_relaxed);
if (r2 == 42) x.store(42, memory_order_relaxed);

However, implementations should not allow such behavior.—end note ]

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